Slow Cooker Chicken Stock


No Comments

Pin Recipe

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read our disclosure policy.

Save money and have a go at making your own slow cooker chicken stock. Homemade chicken stock just got a lot easier thanks to this easy recipe. You only need a few ingredients like chicken, water, fresh vegetables, and a few herbs. This dump-and-go recipe yields a delicious stock that can be eaten by itself or added to enhance your favorite soup.

Use some of this stock to make Slow Cooker Lemon Chicken and Rice Soup or Slow Cooker Curried Chicken Noodle Soup.

Chicken stock cooked in a slow cooker.

Can I make chicken stock in a crockpot?

Absolutely! And it’s honestly the next best thing to Instant Pot chicken stock. The best part about using your slow cooker is you can throw everything in and let it cook for hours. The cooking time is quite long for this recipe, but it’s totally necessary when making your own homemade chicken stock.

I like to call this overnight chicken stock because it will need to cook for at least 12 hours. This means you can start it before bed and have homemade chicken broth in the morning. It’s a great recipe for making canned chicken broth to keep on hand for enjoying on cold days or grabbing to include in other recipes. Oh course this chicken broth is wonderful in slow cooker chicken noodle soup!

Recipe Ingredients

Ingredients for chicken stock on a table.
  • Chicken scraps: Anything works for this, especially leftover chicken bones with meat neck, legs, ribs, and the chicken carcass.
  • Water: You’ll need just enough to fill the crockpot
  • Apple Cider Vinegar: Helps balance the acidity as the stock cooks.
  • Vegetables: At the very least, you’ll want to use celery ribs, carrots, and a sweet onion. These will help add the veggie flavors to the broth during the cooking process.
  • Herbs: Fresh bay leaves, fresh rosemary, fresh thyme, and fresh parsley help enhance the flavors of the stock.
  • Garlic: What’s a good stock without garlic cloves? These also help enhance the flavor of the broth.

Step-by-Step Directions

Four images showing how to make chicken stock in a slow cooker.

Step One – Load the crockpot with all the vegetables and other remaining ingredients. Add enough water to fill the basin and almost cover the ingredients.

Step Two – Cover and turn the cook mode to the LOW setting for 12 hours.

Step Three – Use a slotted spoon or colander to remove the bones and veggies from the crockpot. Discard them.

Step Four – Strain the stock through a fine mesh strainer or fine sieve into mason jars or other airtight containers you already have on hand. Enjoy!

Chicken stock in a slow cooker in a ladle.

What are some ways to use chicken broth?

There are lots of recipes that start with chicken broth, but I bet you’ve never thought to use them when making:

The next time you whip up one of those tasty dishes, don’t forget to use your own slow cooker stock!

Chicken broth in jars.

Recipe FAQs

Can I can this recipe?

No. This recipe is not safe for canning for there are certain requirements that make a recipe for canning.

How do I store homemade stock?

Once you’ve strained the stock into the jars, allow it to cool completely. Seal the jars and store them in the fridge for up to 4 days.

Can I freeze stock?

Yes. You can make chicken stock and store it in the freezer for up to 6 months. Allow the stock to thaw in the fridge before using it.

Can I use roasted chickens, roasted bones, and other chicken pieces?

Yes! You can use a whole chicken, uncooked chicken, dark meat, thigh bones, wing tips, any and all of the edible meat, and the like. When making stock or broth, you can use just about anything you prefer.

Do I need to let the stock cool before storing it?

That’s not necessary; however, if you don’t want to handle hot jars, you can certainly let it cool down a bit.

Should I eat crockpot chicken stock warm or cold?

Crockpot chicken stock is best enjoyed warm on its own or as part of a soup or stew. Let it cool slightly and enjoy with your favorite bread.

Is this the same as bone broth?

Not necessarily. Bone broth utilizes mostly bones whereas stock and broth use bones, cartilage, and anything left over.

Why does it turn to a solid when it’s chilled?

The collagen from the carcass of the chicken leaches out into the stock, making it delicious and nutritious. When the stock is chilled, the collagen causes it to solidify. Don’t worry, it will turn to liquid again once heated.

What is another variation I can make?

If you don’t have a crockpot, you can make homemade chicken stock in a Dutch oven on the stovetop. The downside to this method is that you will have to leave your stove on for many, many hours which can be a little dangerous. The Dutch oven will also take up valuable stovetop space.

Do I have to use apple cider vinegar? Will it make the broth taste like vinegar?

You don’t have to but it will help pull the nutrients and collagen out of the bones and tendons of the chicken carcass. The apple cider vinegar will not negatively impact the flavor of the stock. If anything, it will add a nice depth to it that you wouldn’t get otherwise.

What’s an easy way to obtain chicken bones?

Wondering how you’re going to get all those chicken bones? Well, the best way (in my opinion) is to roast a whole chicken, enjoy the meat, and save the carcass for stock. If you don’t want to roast a whole chicken, you can buy chicken parts at the store, ask the butcher for chicken bones, and/or use the carcass of a store-bought rotisserie chicken after you’ve enjoyed the meat.

Can I just put a whole chicken in the crockpot?

Some people will just throw a whole chicken in the crockpot to make stock. While you can totally do this (it’ll be delicious and you’ll get lots of tasty cooked meat out of the deal), you won’t get as many benefits from the bones. The meat will get in the way of the collagen and other nutrients escaping the bones and seeping into the stock.

Can I make this ahead of time and freeze it?

Absolutely. Strain, seal the cooled stock in jars (or other freezer safe containers), and store them in the freezer for up to 6 months. Allow the stock to thaw in the fridge before using it.

Can I use a crockpot liner?

Yes, a crockpot liner can be used to make chicken stock.

overhead shot of chicken broth in jars.

Want to make more magic in your crockpot? Stay up to date and subscribe to my newsletter and follow along on FacebookInstagramPinterest, Tik Tok, and YouTube.

Chicken stock in a slow cooker in a ladle.

Slow Cooker Chicken Stock

5 from 1 vote
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 12 hours 5 minutes
Servings: 10
All you need are chicken scraps, a few fresh veggies and herbs, and your slow cooker for a chicken stock that can be enjoyed by itself or in your favorite soup recipe.

Equipment

Ingredients 
 

  • chicken bones with meat, neck, legs, ribs, carcass (anything works!)
  • water – enough to fill the crockpot
  • 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 4 celery ribs, diced
  • 2 carrots, diced
  • 1 sweet onion, sliced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 1 sprig fresh thyme
  • 1 bunch fresh parsley
  • 4 garlic cloves

Instructions 

  • Load the crockpot. Load all of the ingredients into the crockpot. Add enough water to fill the basin and almost cover the ingredients.
  • Cook. Cook on low for 12 hours.
  • Strain. Use a slotted spoon or colander to remove the bones and veggies from the crockpot. Discard them. Strain the stock through a fine mesh sieve into jars.

Notes

Storage Instructions:
Once you’ve strained the stock into the jars, allow it to cool completely. Seal the jars and store them in the fridge for up to 4 days or in the freezer for up to 6 months. Allow the stock to thaw in the fridge before using it.
How does it compare to chicken broth?
Let’s talk about the main differences between chicken stock and chicken broth. They are both delicious on their own and as part of other recipes (soups, stews, etc.) but they are not synonymous.
  • Ingredients – Stock utilizes the bones and cartilage of the chicken along with any leftover meat clinging to it. By comparison, broth uses just the meat (no bones, etc.).
  • Time – Chicken stock is cooked for much longer than broth (12-24 hours compared to 1-3)
  • Nutrition – The longer cook time used to make stock allows the bone marrow and collagen in the carcass to release into the liquid, filling it with awesome nutrients that are good for your bones, joints, digestive health, hair, skin, nails, and more. You don’t get these benefits from broth (no bones/cartilage).
  • Consistency – The collagen in stock gives it a thicker consistency than broth. Check out the section below titled “Why does it turn to a solid when it’s chilled?” for more information.
Why does it turn to a solid when it’s chilled?
The collagen from the carcass of the chicken leaches out into the stock, making it delicious and nutritious. When the stock is chilled, the collagen causes it to solidify. Don’t worry, it will turn to liquid again once heated.
What is another variation I can make
If you don’t have a crockpot, you can make homemade chicken stock in a Dutch oven on the stovetop. The downside to this method is that you will have to leave your stove on for many, many hours which can be a little dangerous. The Dutch oven will also take up valuable stovetop space.
Do I have to use apple cider vinegar? Will it make the broth taste like vinegar?
You don’t have to but it will help pull the nutrients and collagen out of the bones and tendons of the chicken carcass. The apple cider vinegar will not negatively impact the flavor of the stock. If anything, it will add a nice depth to it that you wouldn’t get otherwise.
What’s an easy way to obtain chicken bones?
Wondering how you’re going to get all those chicken bones? Well, the best way (in my opinion) is to roast a whole chicken, enjoy the meat, and save the carcass for stock. If you don’t want to roast a whole chicken, you can buy chicken parts at the store, ask the butcher for chicken bones, and/or use the carcass of a store-bought rotisserie chicken after you’ve enjoyed the meat.
Can I just put a whole chicken in the crockpot?
Some people will just throw a whole chicken in the crockpot to make stock. While you can totally do this (it’ll be delicious and you’ll get lots of tasty cooked meat out of the deal), you won’t get as many befits from the bones. The meat will get in the way of the collagen and other nutrients escaping the bones and seeping into the stock.
Can I make this ahead of time and freeze it?
Absolutely. Strain the stock into jars and, once it has cooled, seal the jars and store them in the freezer for up to 6 months. Allow the stock to thaw in the fridge before using it.
Can I use a crockpot liner?
Yes, a crockpot liner can be used to make chicken stock.

Nutrition

Calories: 14kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 0.4g | Fat: 0.1g | Saturated Fat: 0.02g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.03g | Monounsaturated Fat: 0.01g | Sodium: 22mg | Potassium: 104mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 2116IU | Vitamin C: 3mg | Calcium: 16mg | Iron: 0.1mg

Nutrition info is auto-generated. This information is an estimate; if you are on a special diet, please use your own calculations.

Made this recipe? Leave a comment below!

More Slow Cooker Chicken Recipes

Other recipes you may like

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating