Slow Cooker Pork Pozole


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Try this easy slow cooker pork pozole for a weekend meal. It’s a comforting Mexican soup full of pork, hominy, and beans and bursting with chile and lime flavor. Pozole is not complicated to make if you use your slow cooker.

It’s also perfect for those days when I want to come home from work and just sit down to dinner without having to spend hours cooking the day away! You can dump all the ingredients in and go about your business until dinner is ready. If you’re someone who loves a hearty, spicy, and filling soup, this pozole is the recipe for you!

pozole in slow cooker with radish on top

Where Does Pozole Originate?

Pozole originates from Mexico and is made up of hominy, protein (usually pork), vegetables, and spices.

Crockpot pork pozole is usually made with pork and has hominy in it. It’s very high in fiber and low in fat, which makes it a great choice for many people, especially those who are trying to eat more healthily.

What is the Difference Between Pozole and Posole?

Both words refer to the same dish. Some people will say that pozole is a Mexican soup and posole is corn hominy, but others use them interchangeably.

Recipe Ingredients

ingredients for pozole on a table

Ingredients:

  • Pork tenderloin– cut into 1″ cubes
  • Spices – Adobo seasoning powder, cumin, onion powder, oregano, chipotle powder.
  • Fresh lime juice – Fresh limes will add a tangy and fresh flavor to the soup.
  • Sofrito – Sofrito is a sauce that originated in Spain, made of tomato, chili pepper, onion and garlic. It’s used as a base for many Spanish dishes. You can find this on the international foods aisle of your store. If you can’t find it, use one small can of red enchilada sauce in its place.
  • Chicken broth – Since pork broth isn’t widely availble, chicken broth has great flavor.
  • Hominy – This is corn that is dried then proccessed with a solution to remove the skins. This process is called nixtamalization and dates back to 1500–1200 BC. This recipe calls for two cans of hominy, not the dried kind.
  • Pinto beans – drained and rinsed
  • Vegetables – White onion, green chiles and garlic.
  • Ancho chile peppers – These are dried peppers and you can find them on the International foods aisle

Step-by-Step Directions

4 image collage on how to add ingredients for pork pozole into slow cooker

Step One – Add the pork cubes to the crockpot. Add the adobo seasoning powder, cumin onion powder, chipotle chile powder, and oregano. Stir the spices and pork together.

Step Two – Add the hominy and pinto beans.

Step Three – Next, add the onion, green chiles, garlic, and sofrito (or enchilada sauce).

Step Four – Add the chicken broth and lime juice, stir. Place the dried ancho chile peppers on top. Cook on LOW for 7-8 hours. Remove chile peppers, season with salt to taste. Serve and enjoy!

posole with radish and cilantro on top

What’s the Difference Between Posole Verde and Red?

Green pozole (Posole Verde) is a hearty soup made with tomatillos, epazote, cilantro, jalapeños, or pepitas as its main ingredients. Red pozole (Posole Rojo) does not include the green sauce and instead includes a red sauce formed from one or more chiles such as guajillo, piquin, or ancho.

However you choose to eat your posole soup, the good news is that it’s high in fiber and low in fat. Give our Slow Cooker Pork Pozole recipe a try next time you’re feeling adventurous!

3 bowls of pork pozole

Recipe FAQs

Toppings for pozole

Posole soup can be served with a variety of toppings. For some, the toppings are just as important as the soup itself. In Mexico, they typically serve it with lime wedges, shredded cabbage. Other topping ideas are avocado slices and queso fresco cheese. Chips or warm corn tortillas on the side are a great idea too.

Can I use a different type of meat?

Although pozole is usually made with pork, you can use beef, chicken or even turkey if you prefer in this posole recipe, just remember that the flavor will be completely different with a different type of meat.

Can I prepare the day before and reheat?

Yes! In fact, leftovers are even better. Reheat on the stovetop for best results. You may want to add more chicken broth to the leftovers if the soup has thickened too much.

close up of pork pozole in bowl

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posole with radish and cilantro on top

Easy Slow Cooker Pork Pozole

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 7 hours
Total Time: 7 hours 20 minutes
Servings: 8
A Mexican soup with pork, hominy, pinto beans. Flavored with chiles and plenty of lime flavors.

Ingredients 
 

  • 2 lbs. pork tenderloin, cut into 1” cubes
  • 1 tsp. adobo seasoning powder
  • 1 tsp. cumin
  • 1 tsp. onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp. chipotle chili powder
  • 2 tsp. mexican oregano, can use regular oregano
  • 2 limes, juiced (¼ cup) Do not use squeeze bottle lime juice for it will overwhelm this dish.
  • 1 cup sofrito, (if you can't find sofrito, use one 15-oz. can of red enchilada sauce)
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 30 oz. canned hominy beans, drained (two 15-oz. cans)
  • 15 oz. can pinto beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 white onion, diced
  • 6 oz. fire-roasted green chiles, or 1/4 cup chopped poblano peppers
  • 2 ancho chile peppers, (these are dried large chiles)
  • salt to taste

For Serving

  • 1 avocado, sliced
  • 1/2 cup thin sliced radish
  • lime wedges
  • cilantro

Instructions 

  • Cut tenderloin into 1” cubes and place in the slow cooker.
  • Add the adobo seasoning powder, cumin, onion powder, chipotle chile powder, and oregano. Stir the spices and pork together.
  • Add all remaining ingredients to the slow cooker, but add the dried chili peppers on top. Cook on low for 7 hours.
  • Remove dried chili peppers and stir. Add salt to taste.
  • Top with diced avocado, sliced radish, and cilantro. Serve with a lime wedge and tortilla strips and enjoy!

Notes

Where can I find canned hominy, dried ancho chiles, and sofrito?
You can find these items on the international foods aisle . If you can’t find sofrito, red enchilada sauce works well!
Can I use a different kind of meat?
Although pozole is usually made with pork, you can use beef, chicken or even turkey if you prefer in this posole recipe, just remember that the flavor will be completely different with a different type of meat.
Can I prepare the day before and reheat?
Yes! In fact, leftovers are even better. Reheat on the stovetop for best results. You may want to add more chicken broth for the leftovers if the soup has thickened too much.

Nutrition

Calories: 364kcal | Carbohydrates: 40g | Protein: 31g | Fat: 10g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 4g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 74mg | Sodium: 1252mg | Potassium: 1062mg | Fiber: 11g | Sugar: 9g | Vitamin A: 2644IU | Vitamin C: 27mg | Calcium: 88mg | Iron: 4mg

Nutrition info is auto-generated. This information is an estimate; if you are on a special diet, please use your own calculations.

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5 Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    I think this looks delicious…along with all your other recipes! It takes courage to put yourself out there, and respectfully reply to some of the comments you receive. Keep it up!

    1. Sarah Olson says:

      Thank you! I don’t let it get to me anymore. The rude people probably can find something rude to say about anything, so I let it go.

  2. Pina says:

    Where in the world did you get the idea that pozole includes BEANS?!? Have you been to Mexico and eaten pozole there?!?

    1. Sarah Olson says:

      Hi Pina, this is my recipe for Pozole, you can leave the beans out if you choose.

    2. Anonymous says:

      I grew up eating Pinto Pozole as a kid. We always had pinto beans and hominy in ours. However, it was San Diego, and not Mexico.